kinetics

Awesome Client Wednesday- Tim Miller

 Tim Miller “BRINGS IT” during his workouts. With awesome energy and determination to stay fit, we are glad to have Tim on the TEAM. Here are some things he wanted you to know about him:

I am grateful every day for the direction my life has gone. I’ve said it again and again…but I owe so much to Kinetics who made me more cognizant of the benefits of being more aware healthier nutrition habits, yoga and running. I would be a completely different person than I am today if I never started. Other than the obvious benefit of being healthy and staying fit, I have gained so much since starting my journey with running/health//fitness. I have lived in Highland Park for 5 years now, and for 3 ½ of those years I passed by Kinetics twice a day every day becoming more and more curious of just “what the heck what was going on inside” but never had the courage to walk inside. Finally, in January 2016, I wrote down the phone number of Kinetics, and later that day called hoping to get a machine, but a live person answered (Metra), I paused about to hang up but I realized, it was time to get honest and courageous, I scheduled an assessment, and two days later I began boot camp and this incredible journey began. I am a recovering alcoholic and I am coming up on 8 years sobriety this July. I already knew before this part of my journey that if I could adjust my mindset to create an even better version of me by adding a fitness regimen that I could flourish. Now by coupling sobriety and a regular fitness regimen the joy in my life has now multiplied. Today I wake up with determination and go to bed with satisfaction. I work as a Clinical Supervisor at Damon House; a Residential Program licensed and dedicated to serving those whose lives have negatively been impacted by alcohol and drug addiction. Addiction is a result of long term neglect of priority’s, responsibilities and blaming others for the misfortunes in our lives. Taking ownership of our lives is the first step; I have the privilege to share my experience to motivate and inspire many lives daily to begin to take accountability to shape their future.A healthy “mind” “body” and “soul” is the complete fitness regimen. Believe in yourself and success will follow, it’s guaranteed. HAH



Food of the week – Miso Paste

  • Miso is a traditional Asian condiment made by grinding beans and/or grains into a paste, adding salt, and allowing it to ferment.
  • One Tablespoon of Miso Paste has approximately 34 calories, 2 grams protein, 1 gram fiber, 4.5 grams carbs, 1 gram sugar. It also has copper, manganese, Vitamin K, Zinc, phosphorus, and choline.
  • Because miso is fermented, it’s filled with beneficial, live probiotic cultures that have many upsides. You can think of probiotics as the “good bacteria” that inhabit our gut environment and balance “bad bacteria” that we obtain from poor-quality foods, toxins in the environment, contaminated water, pollution and so on.
  • Despite the high sodium content in miso, studies have shown that it doesn’t effect the cardiovascular system the way other high sodium foods do.  It also has been shown to help those with high blood pressure.
  • Miso contains all essential amino acids, making it a complete protein.
  • For those undergoing chemo, miso protects against radiation due to dipilocolonic acid, an alkaloid that chelates heavy metals and discharges them from the body.

Miso.jpg

Fun Fact ~ Miso itself is a Japanese word that translates to “fermented beans”


Raw Pad Thai

​This is a great alternative to the traditional dish served in restaurants! It’s lower in carbohydrates and fats and higher in nutrition.  Keeping it raw maintains the integrity of the vitamins and minerals in the veggies.

​​RawPadThai.jpg

Recipe By:Raw_Angel

Ingredients:

  • ·        2 zucchini, ends trimmed
  • ·        2 carrots
  • ·        1 head red cabbage, thinly sliced
  • ·        1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced
  • ·        1/2 cup bean sprouts
  • ·        3/4 cup raw almond butter
  • ·        2 oranges, juiced
  •          2 tablespoons raw honey
  • ·        1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger root
  • ·        1 tablespoon Nama Shoyu (raw soy sauce)
  • ·        1 tablespoon unpasteurized miso
  • ·        1 clove garlic, minced
  • ·        1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Directions

  1. Slice zucchini lengthwise with a vegetable peeler to create long thin ‘noodles’. Place on individual plates.
  2. Slice carrots into long strips with vegetable peeler similar to the zucchini.
  3. Combine carrots, cabbage, red bell pepper, and bean sprouts in a large bowl.
  4. Whisk together almond butter, orange juice, honey, ginger, Nama Shoyu, miso, garlic, and cayenne pepper in a bowl.
  5. Pour half of sauce into cabbage mixture and toss to coat.
  6. Top zucchini ‘noodles’ with cabbage mixture. Pour remaining sauce over each portion.

Food of the Week – Butter Lettuce

  • Butterhead lettuces are extremely tender, with smooth, loosely-coiled leaves.
  • A 1-cup serving of cut-up butter lettuce contains only 21 calories per serving. With less than half a gram of fat, 3.63 grams of carbohydrate, 0.74 grams of protein, 1.53 grams of sugars and only 8 milligrams of sodium, butter lettuce is a low-fat, low-calorie, low-sodium food choice.
  • A 1-cup serving of cut butter lettuce contains 91 micrograms of vitamin A per serving. vitamin A is necessary to produce as well as maintain healthy skin, soft tissues, mucus membranes, teeth and bones.
  • Butter lettuce also contains more than 56 micrograms of vitamin K in a 1-cup serving.
  • The Phosphorus in butter lettuce is used primarily to produce and maintain healthy bones and teeth. It also helps your body make use of carbohydrates and fats, as well as supporting your kidneys, enabling your muscles to contract, helping your heart beat normally and assisting with basic nerve function.
  • Bibb and Boston lettuce are considered a “butterhead” lettuce. Both are particularly good for using as a wrap, or as a bread substitute.

Butter-Lettuce.png

Fun Fact –  Butterhead lettuce originated in the Mediterranean as a weed with cultivating dating as far back as early as 2680 BC. It was used for treating insomnia, intestinal spasms, and palpitations.


Chicken Lettuce Wraps
​This is a truly guilt free meal! It’s fun to assemble and devour these lettuce wraps. Stick with simple meals like this that are comprised of lean meats and vegetables in order to favorably convert your body composition.

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

Servings: 6

Here’s what you need

  • 4 chicken breasts, chopped
  • 1 Tablespoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 cups white mushrooms, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ⅓ cup pine nuts
  • 1 Tablespoon ginger root, minced
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper
  • ¼ cup coconut aminos (or light soy sauce)
  • ¼ cup coconut palm sugar
  • 1 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 head butter lettuce or iceberg lettuce

Instructions

  1. Place a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the sesame oil and the chopped chicken. Cook until the pink is gone, then drain the skillet.
  2. Add the chopped mushrooms, garlic, pine nuts, ginger, green onions, salt and pepper. Sauté for 8 minutes.
  3. Combine the coconut aminos, coconut palm sugar and vinegar in a small bowl. Pour the sauce over the chicken mixture in the skillet. Mix well and continue to cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Serve with large lettuce leaves. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis

One serving equals: 219 calories, 10g fat, 13g carbohydrate, 80mg sodium, 8g sugar, 1g fiber, and 20g protein.


Food of the Week – Summer Squash

  • Summer squash are members of the Cucurbitaceae family and relatives of both the melon and the cucumber; they come in many different varieties.
  • Unlike winter squash, summer squash is more fragile and cannot be stored for long periods of time unless frozen.
  • Summer squash is a very strong source of antioxidant nutrients, including the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. Since the skin of this food is particularly antioxidant-rich, it’s worth leaving the skin intact and purchasing organic summer squash to help avoid potential unwanted contaminants.
  • Lutein and zeaxanthin are especially helpful in prolonged health of the eye, including protection against age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • Recent research has shown that the polysaccharides in summer squash include an unusual amount of pectin. When consumed regularly, pectin can be a protection against diabetes and better regulation of insulin.
  • These vegetables are very low in calories and sugars making them a favorite addition to those eating a low carb diet. Summer squash is low in calories, carbs, and sugars, but high in essential nutrients like potassiummanganese, and antioxidants like vitamin C andvitamin A.

zucchini.jpg

 

Fun Fact ~ Scientists have found squash seeds preserved in Mexican caves for more than 10,000 years! It was that long ago when domestication of summer squash originated in Mexico and Central America.


Stuffed Summer Squash
​Meatless Monday is a concept that has been gaining popularity over the past decade. The idea is that skipping meat on Mondays will improve our health and the health of the planet. This Stuffed Summer Squash is hearty, flavorful and satisfying…even without the meat!

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

Servings: 3

Here’s what you need

  • 3 yellow summer squash
  • sea salt
  • black pepper
  • 1 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 leek, diced
  • 1 cup mushrooms, diced
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ cup quinoa, cooked
  • ¼ cup fresh basil, minced

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Halve the squash lengthwise and scrape out the seeds. Lightly rub both sides of each squash half with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper. Place, cut side down, on a baking sheet. Roast for 10-15 minutes, until tender. Gently remove the tender center of each squash, leaving the skins intact. Chop the removed squash flesh and set aside. Line the squash halves, hollow side up, back onto the baking sheet.
  2. Place a skillet over medium heat. Add the olive oil and diced leek. Cook, stirring often, for 4 minutes. Add the diced mushroom, fresh thyme and tomato paste. Cook for another 4 minutes. Deglaze the skillet with the wine, cooking for an additional 3 minutes.
  3. Remove the skillet from the heat. Stir in the cooked quinoa, fresh basil and reserved, chopped squash flesh. Fill the squash skins with the quinoa mixture. Place back in the preheated oven for 15 minutes. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis

One serving equals: 163 calories, 3g fat, 25g carbohydrate, 15mg sodium, 2g sugar, 3g fiber, and 6g protein.

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Food of the Week – Coconut Milk

  • Coconut milk isn’t actually “Milk” – it’s a liquid naturally found inside of mature coconuts, stored within coconut meat.
  • Coconut milk contains beneficial fat called lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid that’s easily absorbed and used by the body for energy. Lauric acid is also found in mother’s milk and has been shown to promote brain development and bone health.
  • Medium chain triglycerides found in coconuts go from the digestive tract directly to the liver, where they’re used for energy or ketone production. They are therefore less likely to be stored as fat because they are a fast energy source.
  • Coconuts’ fatty acids are primarily saturated fats, however, they won’t raise your cholesterol levels. In fact, these fatty acids will lower cholesterol levels, improve blood pressure, and prevent heart attacks or a stroke!  
  • Because coconut milk is completely free from dairy, lactose, soy, nuts or grains, it’s a good option for anyone allergic to dairy and nut- or grain-based milks, plus it’s vegan and good for plant-based eaters.

coconuts-and-coconut-milk.jpg        

Fun Fact! If your skin has been exposed to the harsh rays of the sun for a long period and this has caused a rash or a sunburn; coconut milk is an instant healer. Have a bath in coconut milk or apply the milk to the rash and leave it overnight; the milk has cooling properties that will help get rid of the dryness and itchiness of the rash. Wash it off in the morning with c


Golden Cauliflower Rice
​There’s never a shortage of new and delicious ways to serve cauliflower rice, and this golden version is totally worth trying out. The rice is totally worth the effort to use fresh turmeric root! However if you don’t have any fresh turmeric root on hand then feel free to replace it with ½ teaspoon of dried turmeric.

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

Servings: 12

Here’s what you need

  • 1 head cauliflower, leaves removed and stemmed
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 can (13.66oz) coconut milk, full fat
  • 2 tablespoons fresh tumeric root, peeled and finely grated (or ½ teaspoon ground tumeric)
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon coconut palm sugar
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • pinch of ground cardamon
  • ⅓ cup golden raisins
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ⅓ cup salted, chopped pistachios

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to boil. Add the cauliflower for 4 minutes. Drain and cool the cauliflower. Cut into florets.
  2. Shred the cooled cauliflower in a food processor with the grating attachment.
  3. Place the olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add the onion, cook for 5 minutes, until tender. Add the coconut milk, turmeric, salt, coconut sugar, cinnamon and cardamom. Bring the mixture to a gentle boil, then remove from heat and add the raisins. Let steep for 20 minutes.
  4. Return to a low boil, stir in the shredded cauliflower and red pepper flakes. Cook until thickened, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and top with the pistachios. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis

One serving equals: 32 calories, 1g fat, 5g carbohydrate, 46mg sodium, 3g sugar, 1g fiber, and 1g protein.


Food of the Week Mangoes

  • Mangoes are in the same family of plants as pistachios and cashews, which are also tropical, fruit-bearing trees that can grow up to 100 feet in height and is known as “The King of Fruit”.
  • One cup of diced mango contains 100 calories
  • One cup of sliced mangoes supplies 25 percent of the needed daily value of vitamin A , which promotes good eyesight and prevents night blindness and dry eyes.
  • Besides having more than 20 different vitamins and minerals, mangos contain flavonoids like betacarotene, alphacarotene, and beta-cryptoxanthin, which help vitamin A to impart antioxidant strength and maintaining healthy mucous membranes and skin.
  •  Mangoes also have moderate amounts of copper. Copper is a co-factor for many vital enzymes and is also required for the production of red blood cells.
  • Mangoes can vary in skin color — from green to red or yellow to orange — but the inner flesh of the mango is typically golden yellow.
  • Since mangoes are a food rich in magnesium and potassium as well as low in sodium, they are another natural way to lower blood pressure.

mangoes-ripe_orig.jpg

 

·        Fun Facts: Mango seeds traveled with humans from Asia to the Middle East, East Africa and South America beginning around 300 or 400 A.D.


Rainbow Trout with Mango Chutney
​Here’s a tasty way to prepare and enjoy fresh trout from the lake! The mango chutney is phenomenal all by itself, with notes of ginger, curry and lime taking center stage. The simple marinade on the trout saturates pleasing flavor into each bite. This recipe is a great one to add to your meal prep recipe list.

Don’t limit yourself to just using trout with this recipe. If Mahi Mahi is more readily available to you then go with that.

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

Servings: 4

Here’s what you need

For the Rainbow Trout

  • 1 lemon juice
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • dash of Red Pepper Flakes
  • 1 teaspoon Garlic, minced
  • 4 Rainbow Trout Fillets (or Mahi Mahi)

For the Chutney

  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon Garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon Ginger Root, minced
  • 1 small red onion, chopped
  • 1 small red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 small green bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 ripe Mangoes, chopped (don’t worry if your mangoes aren’t very ripe — once cooked it tastes much sweeter)
  • 2 lime juices
  • 1 tablespoon Curry Powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • dash of nutmeg
  • dash of Red Pepper Flakes

For the Sautéed Cabbage

  • 1 small head Green Cabbage
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • dash of sea salt
  • dash of black pepper

Instructions

For the Trout

  1. Place all ingredients, except the fish, in a high-speed blender. Blend until fully combined.
  2. Combine the marinade with fillets in a large ziplock bag. Place in the fridge for 60 minutes.
  3. Preheat oven to 450 degrees F, if fish is frozen; or 375 degrees F, if fish is thawed.
  4. Grease a pan and place fish fillets on it. For frozen fish, bake for 12-20 minutes, until fish is opaque and flakes easily. For thawed fish, bake for 6 minutes, then flip and bake for additional 6 minutes.

For the Chutney

  1. In a large skillet, heat coconut oil over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger root and sauté for a minute.
  2. Add the onion and bell peppers and sauté for a few minutes.
  3. Add the mango and spices. Continue to sauté for another 5 minutes, until everything has softened.
  4. Turn the heat down to low and simmer for another 10 minutes.

For the Sautéed Cabbage

  1. Wash cabbage and discard the first few leaves. Slice it thinly.
  2. Place a large skillet on medium heat. Add the coconut oil, and once that melts, add the cabbage.
  3. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

To Serve

  1. Arrange each plate with a bed of cabbage then top with a fillet smothered in chutney. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis

One serving equals: 364 calories, 13g fat, 45g carbohydrate, 38g sugar, 338mg sodium, 6g fiber, and 20g protein.

 


Food of the Week: Turmeric

  • It’s important to know that the vast majority of studies on turmeric have not examined the spice itself, but rather one of its constituents called curcumin. Curcumin is a polyphenol in turmeric with a quite remarkable set of potential health benefits. 
  • Some of the benefits of consuming turmeric are regulation of inflammation, oxidation, cell signaling, blood sugar levels, blood fat levels, and brain levels of the omega-3 fatty acid called DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).
  • Turmeric’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties work better than some of the strongest medicines, without the dangerous side effects. After much research, physicians recommend using curcumin for people with deep vein thrombosis rather than medications!
  • The Journal of Phytotherapy Research has published results of a study done with 60 human volunteers who suffer from depression. When treated with curcumin vs Prozac and a combination of the two, not only was it discovered that all patients tolerated curcumin well, but they discovered curcumin was as effective as Prozac in managing depression.
  • The curcumin in turmeric is also used to treat cancer.  It seems to be able to kill cancer cells and prevent more from growing. It has the best effects on breast cancer, bowel cancer, stomach cancer and skin cancer cells. 

Turmeric.jpg

 

Fun Fact:  Turmeric paste is a home remedy for sunburn and it is also an ingredient in many commercial sunscreens.


Lemony Kale Quinoa With Turmeric And Chicken
​What to do with fresh turmeric root? Why turn it into this SUPER FOOD medley! The fresh turmeric is extremely easy to incorporate into the dish and is used in both the marinade for the chicken and in the quinoa.

Note: for those on a super low carb diet, feel free to sub in 4 cups of shredded cauliflower or Brussels sprouts in place of the quinoa. Reduce the broth to 1/4 cup and reduce the cook time in half.

Courtesy of RealHealthyRecipes.com

Servings: 6

Here’s what you need

For the Turmeric Marinated Chicken

  • 1 cup coconut cream
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon freshly grated turmeric root
  • 1 teaspoon Ginger Root
  • juice from 1 Lemon
  • ½ teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1 clove Garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 pounds raw chicken breast, cubed

For the Quinoa

  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon Curry Powder
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed and drained
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 2 baby kale, chopped
  • juice from ½ Lemon
  • 2 tablespoons raw pepitas

Instructions

  1. Combine all of the marinade ingredients in a bowl, except for the chicken. Mix well to combine. Add the chicken cubes and mix well. Cover and place in the fridge for 2 hours, or up to overnight.
  2. Preheat the oven to 360 degrees F. Lightly coat a baking sheet with olive oil. Place the chicken cubes on the pan so that they aren’t touching. Bake for 20 minutes. Without removing the chicken from the oven switch to the high broil for 5 to 10 minutes. Remove once golden.
  3. In a medium sauce pan place the coconut oil over medium heat. Add the turmeric, curry and cumin. Heat until fragrant. Add the quinoa and stir frequently until it starts to make popping sounds.
  4. Add the chicken broth and bring to a low simmer. Cover, reduce the heat to low, and cook undisturbed for 10 minutes. Remove the lid, stir in the kale, and place the lid back, cooking for another undisturbed 10 minutes. Turn the heat off and let the quinoa sit for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and transfer to a bowl. Fluff the quinoa and mix in the lemon juice. Garnish with pepitas and serve with the chicken. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis

One serving equals: 330 calories, 21g fat, 21g carbohydrate, 300mg sodium, 1g sugar, 4g fiber, and 15g protein.


Food of the Week- Turmeric

  • It’s important to know that the vast majority of studies on turmeric have not examined the spice itself, but rather one of its constituents called curcumin. Curcumin is a polyphenol in turmeric with a quite remarkable set of potential health benefits.
  • Some of the benefits of consuming turmeric are regulation of inflammation, oxidation, cell signaling, blood sugar levels, blood fat levels, and brain levels of the omega-3 fatty acid called DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).
  • Turmeric’s powerful anti-inflammatory properties work better than some of the strongest medicines, without the dangerous side effects. After much research, physicians recommend using curcumin for people with deep vein thrombosis rather than medications!
  • The Journal of Phytotherapy Research has published results of a study done with 60 human volunteers who suffer from depression. When treated with curcumin vs Prozac and a combination of the two, not only was it discovered that all patients tolerated curcumin well, but they discovered curcumin was as effective as Prozac in managing depression.
  • The curcumin in turmeric is also used to treat cancer.  It seems to be able to kill cancer cells and prevent more from growing. It has the best effects on breast cancer, bowel cancer, stomach cancer and skin cancer cells. 


Awesome Client Monday

Do you know Chiara? A Kinetics veteran, this mom on-the-go makes sure physical fitness is a permanent part of her daily life! It is no strange occurrence to see Chiara in classes and Personal Training at Kinetics multiple times each week. Some things she wanted you to know about her and her fitness journey are below!

“Keeping physically fit has had a great affect in my daily life –very positive! My quality of life has improved a lot. The way I feel…and kind of look too! I first crossed paths with Kinetics by just walking in! I had spoken with Metra, and everything made me stick around; it was the convenience, commitment, community, everything. Having a regular fitness regimen keeps my energy up daily. A piece of advice I would give someone who doesn’t have a regular fitness regimen, but looking to get one would be simply—come to Kinetics!”